Feature Search

Feature Comments Updated
1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ... 40
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jordan Sager,23d Medical Operations Squadron mental health technician, begins an alcohol drug abuse prevention and treatment briefing, Feb. 11, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. ADAPT is a program designed to educate, prevent and treat substance abuse throughout the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Daniel Snider/Released) ADAPT proactively educates Airmen, helps save lives
Military members constantly face changes in leadership, the potential to move or the possibility of deploying overseas. Since these situations can induce stress, some people may turn to substance abuse as a coping mechanism.In order to combat the temptation of substance abuse, the Alcohol Drug and Prevention Treatment program proactively educates
0 3/07
2016
John Fischbach Sr., 23d Force Support Squadron recreation aide and Gail Fischbach, 23d FSS volunteer, sand woodblocks Jan. 15, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Gail and John work in the Woodshop, and enjoy making masterpieces for the local community. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Janiqua P. Robinson/Released) Husband, wife woodwork through life
For some folks, working with your significant other may seem like a nightmare, but one Moody couple depends on one another in order to get the job done.John Fischbach Sr., 23d Force Support Squadron recreation aide, and his wife Gail, 23d FSS volunteer, work side-by-side at the base woodshop to create wooden showpieces for team Moody."I love
0 2/19
2016
Default Air Force Logo The last defense: SRT safeguards Moody from high-risks
Since the beginning of time, the world's hierarchies have assembled special groups of warriors with the sole purpose of ensuring safety of their communities at all costs.One of these groups is the 23d Security Forces Squadron's Special Reaction Team. They are responsible for defending Moody's perimeters and safeguarding the approximate 6,000
0 2/19
2016
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Amanda Griggs, 23d Maintenance Operations Flight engine management engine manager, documents debrief recap paperwork information, Feb. 5, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Griggs is responsible for viewing engine flight operations and performances that help determine possible additional maintenance based on engine performance. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Greg Nash/Released) Enter the matrix: EM administers maintenance
Every day, Moody's aerospace propulsion maintainers perform countless hours of maintenance on millions of dollars' worth of equipment. A group of individuals is in charge of keeping track of this maintenance and equipment.The 23d Maintenance Operations Flight's engine management section supports their maintainer counterparts by planning, organizing
0 2/05
2016
The 23d Medical Operations Squadron’s immunization clinic provides vaccinations to combat illnesses and prevent diseases for all of Moody’s active-duty personnel, dependents and retirees. The clinic utilizes disease preventable vaccines while teaching the safety, prevention, effectiveness and protective measures of the medical procedures. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Nash/Released) Moody immunization clinic saves lives one shot at a time
Annually, thousands of individuals enter Moody's immunization clinic after being alerted that it's that time of year again for their vaccinations. After the notification, anxiety overpowers some and others become weary due to painful and discomforting past experiences associated with receiving shots.Fortunately for Team Moody's personnel, the 23d
0 1/27
2016
U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Joshua Toellner, 23d Operation Support Squadron air traffic control craftsman, controls a simulator, Jan. 15, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The trainer controls the simulator so ATC trainees get the experience of controlling air traffic without a real consequence of errors. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Janiqua P. Robinson/Released) RAPCON keeps watchful eye on Moody sky
When skies are cloudy and visibility is low, pilots rely heavily on the air traffic controllers in the Radar Approach Control facility to help them travel safely. Constant training is vital to their mission because it makes sure they know their job inside and out.Air traffic controllers assigned to the RAPCON have the responsibility of monitoring,
0 1/27
2016
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tony Alviruzi, 23d Equipment Maintenance Squadron non-destructive unit fabrication flight journeyman, inspects a UV-ray radiometer Jan. 12, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Black lighting is used to detect cracks and damage to aircraft components that may not be seen by the naked eye. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Greg Nash/Released) 
NDI unit glimpses beyond the naked eye
Enclosed in this building, there aren't any signs directing patients moving gingerly due to pain from broken bones waiting to see a radiologist. Nor are there expecting mothers seeking assistance from sonographers.However, within the confines of the same building, are a special group of maintainers. Similar to medical professionals, they utilize
0 1/15
2016
Retired U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Alan Landers, 93d Air Ground Operations Wing historian, explains artifacts displayed in Heritage Hall during a tour, Nov. 15, 2015, at Moody Air Force Base Ga. This was the first tour Landers conducted in the newly renovated Heritage Hall. Participants were able to ask questions and swap stories about the 93d AGOW. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Janiqua P. Robinson/Released) AGOW historian pens yesteryears
On Jan. 16, 1957, three Boeing B-52 Stratofortresses of the 93rd Bombardment Wing, later designated as the 93d Air Ground Operations Wing, soared for 45 hours and 19 minutes to become the first jet aircraft to circle the world nonstop. This milestone, and others like it would be lost forever without someone working to keep track and recording the
0 1/06
2016
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Nikolas Truesdell, left, and Airman Paul Person, 23d Security Forces Squadron installation entry controllers, check identification, Nov. 11, 2015, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The IECs also conduct Random Anti-Terrorist Measures, during which they may ask to see someone’s driver’s license and vehicle registration. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kathleen D. Bryant/Released)
First-line Sentries: defending Team Moody, assets
Whether responding to an emergency on base or checking identification at the gate, a select group of Airmen work day and night to keep Team Moody safe.The Airmen of the 23d Security Forces Squadron provide security to their home station as well as organize, train and deploy combat Airmen to sustain worldwide combat search and rescue
0 12/11
2015
Default Air Force Logo Analysis, documentation keep aircraft safe
Two sections of the 23d Maintenance Operation Flight use data to paint a picture of aircraft health, here.The plans, scheduling and documentation section, or PSD, enters data about maintenance into the Integrated Maintenance Data System (IMDS). Afterwards, maintenance management analysis, or MMA, collects and analyzes that data, which can help make
0 11/25
2015
1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ... 40
RSS