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  • 23d CES speaks up for pets, helps prepare owners

    Members of the 23d Civil Engineer Squadron, along with the American Red Cross, held a National Preparedness Month event, Sept. 23, here. The event revolved around the 23d CES handing out free items to spread awareness about how pet owners can better prepare if a disaster hits.
  • 23d MDSS: drawing blood, safeguarding Flying Tigers

    People may think our nation is kept secure solely by Airmen flying jets and jumping out of planes, but sometimes it’s the ones in lab coats that help maintain our Airmen’s wellbeing so they can finish the fight. The 23rd Medical Support Squadron’s medical laboratory, coupled with their specialized equipment, help fend off various diseases, illnesses and ailments to ensure Airmen are fit to fight. With over 90,000 blood samples processed each year, these Airmen carry their weight in safeguarding Moody’s Airmen.
  • Team Moody prepares for hurricane

    Around and round it goes, what it will do? No one knows. It’s big, it’s strong, and it’s fast, leaving nothing but destruction in its path. As we witness this devastation left from Hurricane Harvey and watch as Hurricanes Irma, Jose, and Katia continue brewing, it is important to know how to prepare and to develop a plan.
  • 5k sets pace for National Preparedness Month

    The 23d Civil Engineer Squadron hosted a 5k fun run to kickoff National Preparedness Month, Sept. 1, here. National Preparedness Month is designed to educate and empower not only the base, but also the community on preparing for any disaster.
  • Team Moody gives back to Operation Cinderella

    Moody’s annual Operational Cinderella, a donation drive for formal women’s attire, is in full swing and is slated to run until Sept. 16, here. Operation Cinderella is a nation-wide donation drive that was adopted by Moody in order to gain maximum participation for the upcoming Air Force Ball by providing free formal women’s attire to those who wish to attend.
  • A 23d Wing ‘hawg’ gets a bath

    What has roughly 40 teeth, sounds like ‘brrrt,’ and occasionally needs a bath? The 23d Wing’s A-10C Thunderbolt IIs, also known as ‘Hawgs,’ are subject to an assortment of scheduled maintenance appointments to include washes every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours. “It’s extremely important that maintenance keeps the aircraft clean,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Thomas Harney, 75th Fighter Squadron director of operations and A-10 pilot. “Every time we fire the gun, gases flow up and cover the aircraft with grease which can affect operational components of the aircraft and the pilot’s visibility.”
  • 23d CES combats mosquito threats

    Due to recent confirmed cases of mosquito disease outbreaks by the Georgia Department of Public Health in South Georgia, Moody’s 23d Civil Engineering Squadron pest management team is being proactive to combat mosquito-borne illnesses. They are accomplishing this by teaching Airmen, their families and the community about mosquito-borne illnesses, the symptoms to look out for, and the precautions to take to avoid being infected by a mosquito.
  • Be memorable, inspire future generations

    Staff Sgts. Stan Mason, Charlie Jefferson, Doc Lawrence, and Master Sgt. Kenneth G. Webb. None of you know these individuals, but their legacy and efforts as supervisors are evident.These NCOs were my very first influences in the Air Force and the reason I am wearing these chevrons today.Front-line supervisors have the greatest impact on the Air
  • ACCA: training insight to beat CBRN’s

    Airmen from the 347th Operations Support Squadron performed Aircrew Contamination Control Area training, Aug. 24, here. ACCA training teaches aircrew how to remove and properly handle any contamination on their gear. The training is provided monthly or at the request of the aircrew.
  • Emergency exercise tests Moody’s capabilities

    The 23d Wing Inspection Team held an emergency response exercise, Aug. 22, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The purpose of this particular exercise was to inspect the recovery phase of an active-shooter situation. “In my twelve years, I’ve been to very few exercises that flow from the beginning to the actual responding, recovery and clean-up,” said U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Ross Stiegemeier, 23d Wing NCO in charge of the Wing Inspection Team. “So this time we were focused on the recovery phase in the [scenario] where the individuals are dead. There’s no longer a threat, so what do we do now?”
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