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Emerge Moody learns how medical pumps life into Moody

Airmen from Emerge Moody experience what different career fields do in the 23d Medical Group, Nov. 3, 2016 at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Emerge Moody is a deliberate leadership development program geared towards giving junior enlisted and officers an opportunity to better understand Air Force mission sets. (Courtesy Photo)

Airmen from Emerge Moody experience what different career fields do in the 23d Medical Group, Nov. 3, 2016 at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Emerge Moody is a deliberate leadership development program geared towards giving junior enlisted and officers an opportunity to better understand Air Force mission sets. (Courtesy Photo)

Airmen from Emerge Moody experience what different career fields do in the 23d Medical Group, Nov. 3, 2016 at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Emerge Moody is a deliberate leadership development program geared towards giving junior enlisted and officers an opportunity to better understand Air Force mission sets. (Courtesy Photo)

Airmen from Emerge Moody experience what different career fields do in the 23d Medical Group, Nov. 3, 2016 at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Emerge Moody is a deliberate leadership development program geared towards giving junior enlisted and officers an opportunity to better understand Air Force mission sets. (Courtesy Photo)

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. --

The second month in the Emerge Moody’s nine month journey landed the team at the 23d Medical Group where they learned what medics bring to the fight.

The day started out with the class members being broken up into four separate groups to allow for more interaction and coverage of all the sections in the 23d Medical Group.  They began with what the MDG calls, the daily huddle, to demonstrate how the various teams begin their day.

After a mission brief, the groups began a behind the scenes tour of the dental, physical therapy, pharmacy, logistics, and immunizations sections, where they interacted with fellow airmen from the various medical teams.  The class members were impressed and inspired by the amount of skill and pride each member of the medical group displayed throughout the day.

One of the class members from the 23d Force Support Squadron, Tech. Sgt. Michaela Maximin, said that what stood out for her was “seeing first-hand the passion of the Airmen, and the knowledge level of each briefer as they gave us a hands-on demonstration.”

The class then participated in a series of unit demonstrations.  At bioenvironmental engineering, they participated in a mock hazardous material response drill.  At the laboratory, they observed cells in microscopes, saw a demo of a fellow Airmen running a chemistry sample and gained an appreciation for the logistics of shipping and receiving lab samples.  They also met with the mental health team where they were educated on some of myths about the consequences of their services. At the simulation lab, the groups were even allowed to administer an intravenous on a lifelike body used for training.

The Emerge Moody class was also immersed into physical therapy department where they had a chance to use the alter-g. This suit allows for your lower body to feel weightless while the patient rehabilitates their lower extremities. Members were also shown the different equipment used to get Airmen healthy again and back to contributing to the mission.

The 23d Medical Group allowed Emerge Moody to see medical for the true power and influence they bring to the flight.

“Last month we learned about aircraft maintenance and how it is fundamental to performing the mission.  This month we learned about another maintenance group - human maintenance. Human maintenance is just as important as aircraft maintenance, because without our people functioning at their best, we won’t have anyone to accomplish the mission”, said Capt Grant E. Farnsworth, 23d Wing judge advocate.