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Airmen upload LOX for Hawgsmoke 2021

A photo of Airmen pushing a liquid oxygen cart

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Hunter Crouch, left, and Senior Airman Zachary Ferracciolo, crew chiefs assigned to the 122nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Indiana Air National Guard, push a liquid oxygen cart during Hawgsmoke 2021, April 16, 2021, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. The mission of the 122nd Maintenance Group is to produce safe, reliable, mission-ready aircraft, equipment and Airmen capable of global employment to meet the needs of the United States and the state of Indiana. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hayden Legg)

A photo of an Airman connecting a liquid oxygen hose to an aircraft

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Hunter Crouch, a crew chief assigned to the 122nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Indiana Air National Guard, connects a liquid oxygen hose to an A-10C Thunderbolt II during Hawgsmoke 2021, April 16, 2021, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. Liquid oxygen is cooled to around minus 297 degrees Fahrenheit, so Airmen who handle it must use protective equipment to avoid burns. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hayden Legg)

A photo of an Airman turning a valve on a liquid oxygen cart

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Hunter Crouch, a crew chief assigned to the 122nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Indiana Air National Guard, turns a valve on a liquid oxygen cart during Hawgsmoke 2021, April 16, 2021, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. Liquid oxygen, or LOX, provides pilots with on-board breathable air for flight at high altitudes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hayden Legg)

A photo of an Airman observing liquid oxygen as it vents from an aircraft

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Hunter Crouch, a crew chief assigned to the 122nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Indiana Air National Guard, observes liquid oxygen as it vents from an A-10C Thunderbolt II during Hawgsmoke 2021, April 16, 2021, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. Liquid oxygen, or LOX, evaporates at temperatures above minus 297 degrees Fahrenheit and must be kept extremely cold during upload. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hayden Legg)

A photo of an Airman observing gauges on a liquid oxygen cart

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Hunter Crouch, a crew chief assigned to the 122nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Indiana Air National Guard, observes gauges on a liquid oxygen cart during Hawgsmoke 2021, April 16, 2021, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. Hawgsmoke is a biennial competition designed to test the ability, both in the air and on the ground, of A-10C Thunderbolt II pilots and maintainers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hayden Legg)

A photo of an Airman removing a liquid oxygen hose from an aircraft

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Hunter Crouch, a crew chief assigned to the 122nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Indiana Air National Guard, removes a liquid oxygen hose from an A-10C Thunderbolt II during Hawgsmoke 2021, April 16, 2021, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. More than 150 Airmen assigned to 13 units across the Air Force came to Moody to compete in Hawgsmoke. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hayden Legg)

A photo of an Airman removing a liquid oxygen vent line

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Hunter Crouch, a crew chief assigned to the 122nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Indiana Air National Guard, removes a liquid oxygen vent line from an A-10C Thunderbolt II during Hawgsmoke 2021, April 16, 2021, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. Crew chiefs, or tactical aircraft maintenance specialists, ensure the aircraft in their care are ready to fly at a moment’s notice so pilots can safely and effectively complete their mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hayden Legg)

A photo of an Airman removing a grounding clamp

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Zachary Ferracciolo, a crew chief assigned to the 122nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Indiana Air National Guard, removes a grounding clamp used for liquid oxygen upload during Hawgsmoke 2021, April 16, 2021, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. During the transfer of liquid oxygen, or LOX, the LOX cart is grounded to prevent the hazardous buildup of electrical charge. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hayden Legg)

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. --