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Moody prepares for hurricane season

Photo of 23d Civil Engineer Squadron personnel practicing emergency management procedures.

Master Sgt. Terri Adams, left, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron Emergency Management Flight section chief, and Timothy Sirmans, 23d CES installation emergency manager, practice emergency management procedures May 14, 2020, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. The 23d CES Emergency Management Flight wants Team Moody to stay educated and prepared to weather any storm. For further information, visit www.beready.af.mil or contact the emergency management flight at 229-257-1772. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Erick Requadt)

Photo of Airman examining a hurricane's trajectory.

Master Sgt. Terri Adams, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron Emergency Management Flight section chief, examines a hurricane’s trajectory May 14, 2020, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. The 23d CES Emergency Management Flight wants Team Moody to stay educated and prepared to weather any storm. For further information, visit www.beready.af.mil or contact the emergency management flight at 229-257-1772. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Erick Requadt)

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. --

Hurricane season officially begins today and there are many ways Moody Airmen and families can prepare themselves and remain informed.

The 23d Civil Engineer Squadron Emergency Management Flight wants Team Moody to stay educated and prepared to weather any storm.

“Prepare now, have a plan to stay and have a plan to evacuate,” said Master Sgt. Terri Adams, 23d CES Emergency Management Flight section chief. “If you stay ready, you don't have to get ready.”

The emergency management flight recommends having a kit outfitted with items one may need for families and pets. Adams explained people can prepare for hurricanes by gathering enough resources to last 72 hours.

“Have a kit in your home, with food and medical care items, and enough medicine to last you without having to get them refilled right away,” Adams said. “You also want to have an emergency kit that you can grab and hit the road if it's getting bad enough here.”

Adams explained that other items people should include in their kit are cash, a weather radio, clothes, batteries and flashlights.

“We like to tell people that preparedness is a year-round sport because you never know what's going to happen,” Adams said. “It’s important to have a good source of food and water supplies as well as gas in your vehicle and maybe a spare tank.”

In addition to a homemade kit and supplies, Adams emphasized some practices for staying protected at home.

“The biggest thing is to stay indoors,” Adams said. “Get everyone inside before the storm even gets near you. Pick up everything outside so it doesn't become a hazard. Close and lock all your doors. If you don’t have a lot of options, then simply stay in an interior room, as an interior room with no windows is the best level of protection that you're going to get in your home.”

Whether deciding to evacuate or if an evacuation order has been issued, Hank Santicola, 23d Wing plans and programs manager, explained how to safely evacuate.

“Make sure you have a plan of where you're going to go, because hotels and roads can get crowded,” Santicola said. “It’s also important to have a family communication plan so they know where you’re at. Knowing what emergency supplies you should need and how to prepare your property while you’re gone are crucial as well when evacuating.”

Santicola explained how Team Moody can stay informed during disasters through the AtHoc system, which he recommended updating with current contact information.

“The base will get very accurate information tailored to Moody,” Santicola said. “You can get the AtHoc messages that'll keep you up-to-date every time a hurricane condition changes or instructions are sent out.”

For further information, visit www.beready.af.mil or contact the emergency management flight at 229-257-1772.