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Cannibalism ensures fleet health

A photo of an Airman covering a relay box

Staff Sgt. Jacob Eveland 723d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron integrated flight control system journeyman, covers connectors on a Symbol Generator Unit relay box Feb. 12, 2020, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. Airmen with the 723d AMXS remove serviceable components from the ‘CANN Bird’ in order to return aircraft back to mission-capable status. A cannibalized aircraft, or CANN Bird, refers to an aircraft utilized as a temporary supply point for critical parts when lead time for those respective parts through the normal supply system/process is not sufficient enough to meet operational demands. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Elijah M. Dority)

A photo of an Airman closing a box

Senior Airman Justin Hahn, 723d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron electrical and environmental technician, puts serviceable HH-60G Pave Hawk components into storage, Feb. 12, 2020, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. Airmen with the 723d AMXS remove serviceable components from the ‘CANN Bird’ in order to return aircraft back to mission-capable status. A cannibalized aircraft, or CANN Bird, refers to an aircraft utilized as a temporary supply point for critical parts when lead time for those respective parts through the normal supply system/process is not sufficient enough to meet operational demands. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Elijah M. Dority)

A photo of an unscrewing a bolt.

Staff Sgt. Joshua Hau, 723d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron communication navigator journeyman, removes bolts from a Symbol Generator Unit mount Feb. 12, 2020, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. Airmen with the 723d AMXS remove serviceable components from the ‘CANN Bird’ in order to return aircraft back to mission-capable status. A cannibalized aircraft, or CANN Bird, refers to an aircraft utilized as a temporary supply point for critical parts when lead time for those respective parts through the normal supply system/process is not sufficient enough to meet operational demands. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Elijah M. Dority)

A photo of an Airman checking a helicopter

Staff Sgt. Joshua Hau, 723d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron communication navigator journeyman, prepares to remove a Symbol Generator Unit mount Feb. 12, 2020, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. Airmen with the 723d AMXS remove serviceable components from the ‘CANN Bird’ in order to return aircraft back to mission-capable status. A cannibalized aircraft, or CANN Bird, refers to an aircraft utilized as a temporary supply point for critical parts when lead time for those respective parts through the normal supply system/process is not sufficient enough to meet operational demands. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Elijah M. Dority)

A photo of an Airman flipping a switch

Senior Airman Justin Hahn, 723d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron electrical and environmental technician, checks a circuit break on an HH-60G Pave Hawk Feb. 12, 2020, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. Airmen with the 723d AMXS remove serviceable components from the ‘CANN Bird’ in order to return aircraft back to mission-capable status. A cannibalized aircraft, or CANN Bird, refers to an aircraft utilized as a temporary supply point for critical parts when lead time for those respective parts through the normal supply system/process is not sufficient enough to meet operational demands. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Elijah M. Dority)

A photo of an Airman unscrewing a helicopter part.

Staff Sgt. Walker Hickey, 723d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron electrical and environmental journeyman, removes a distributor from an HH-60G Pave Hawk, Feb. 12, 2020, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. Airmen with the 723d AMXS remove serviceable components from the ‘CANN Bird’ in order to return aircraft back to mission-capable status. A cannibalized aircraft, or CANN Bird, refers to an aircraft utilized as a temporary supply point for critical parts when lead time for those respective parts through the normal supply system/process is not sufficient enough to meet operational demands. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Elijah M. Dority)

A photo of two Airmen passing a helicopter distributor

Staff Sgt. Walker Hickey, right, 723d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron electrical and environmental journeyman, hands a serviceable distributor to Senior Airman Justin Hahn, 723d AMXS E and E technician, Feb. 12, 2020, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. Airmen with the 723d AMXS remove serviceable components from the ‘CANN Bird’ in order to return aircraft back to mission-capable status. A cannibalized aircraft, or CANN Bird, refers to an aircraft utilized as a temporary supply point for critical parts when lead time for those respective parts through the normal supply system/process is not sufficient enough to meet operational demands. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Elijah M. Dority)

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. --