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DICE kits to assist intel analysts

Photo of Airmen inspecting a multi-mission terminal

U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Joseph Tamesis, left, 347th Operations Support Squadron Officer in charge of operations, and 1st Lt. Carl De Belen, 41st Rescue Squadron Officer in charge of squadron intelligence, inspect a multi-mission terminal at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Oct. 26, 2021. A multi-mission terminal is one of multiple pieces of a Deployed Independent Communications Element kit. A DICE kit gives intel analysts the ability to operate in a contested environment with a reduced risk of leaking classified information. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jasmine M. Barnes)

Photo of Airmen attaching hub reflectors to a multi-mission terminal

U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Joseph Tamesis, right, 347th Operations Support Squadron Officer in charge of operations, and 1st Lt. Carl De Belen, 41st Rescue Squadron Officer in charge of squadron intelligence, attaches hub reflectors to a multi-mission terminal at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Oct. 26, 2021. A multi-mission terminal is one of multiple pieces of a Deployed Independent Communications Element kit. A DICE kit is a mobile satellite communications system that has the capability to establish and maintain connectivity to classified networks. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jasmine M. Barnes)

Photo of Airmen preparing to configure a multi-mission terminal

U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Joseph Tamesis, left, 347th Operations Support Squadron Officer in charge of operations, and 1st Lt. Carl De Belen, 41st Rescue Squadron Officer in charge of squadron intelligence, prepare to configure a multi-mission terminal at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Oct. 26, 2021. A multi-mission terminal is one of multiple pieces of a Deployed Independent Communications Element kit. A DICE kit allows intel analysts to set up secure communications downrange with a smaller footprint in the area of responsibility. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jasmine M. Barnes)

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. -- The 23rd Wing is one of the first lead wings to implement the Deployed Intelligence Combat Element (DICE) kit in an effort to support Agile Combat Employment.

"Agile Combat Employment is all about providing agility and lethality to our Air Force and Joint Force commanders across the globe," said Brig. Gen. Steven Gorski, director of intelligence for Air Combat Command. "The concept requires resilient and secure communications to maintain battlespace awareness. The DICE kits put capability in the hands of our Airmen today so they can refine their approach as they exercise Agile Combat Employment in austere conditions across multiple theaters.”

The DICE kit allows intel analysts to easily establish secure communications downrange with a smaller footprint in the area of responsibility.

“(The kit) gives us the ability to pick up and move to a bare base in a condensed amount of time and re-establish our communications,” said Master Sgt. Shane Law, 23rd Wing A-2 superintendent. “If something popped off on the other side of the globe, we can go there, then set up a Combat Intelligence Cell in about 30 minutes.”

The DICE kit is made up of multiple pieces to include a router, a satellite communications antenna, power generators and more. The specifics of how it works are classified, but one of the biggest takeaways from this equipment is that it gives analysts the ability to operate in a contested environment with a reduced risk of leaking classified information.

“(The DICE kit) allows us to perform a wide array of functions like battle tracking, threat analysis, and command and control,” said 1st Lt. Joseph Tamesis, 347th Operations Support Squadron Intelligence Flight officer in charge of operations. “With this kind of technology, we don’t have to rely on existing infrastructure.”

The implementation of the kit is still in its early stages across the Air Force. However, Team Moody is ready to operate with it as soon as tomorrow.