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38, 41 RQS conduct alternate insertion extraction training

Photo of Airmen rappelling from a helicopter

Two U.S. Air Force 38th Rescue Squadron pararescuemen descend from a 41st Rescue Squadron HH-60W Jolly Green II during alternate insertion extraction training at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Sept. 23, 2021. Part of PJ’s mission is to rescue and recover downed aircrews from hostile or austere locations. Regular AIE training prepares them for future contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

Photo of helicopter lifting off

A U.S. Air Force HH-60W Jolly Green II lands during alternate insertion extraction training at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Sept. 23, 2021. Pararescuemen train with the HH-60 on various AIE methods to maintain proficiency. The four most common methods used during AIE are fast-rope, rope ladder, rappel and hoist. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

Photo of Airmen rappelling from a helicopter

A U.S. Air Force HH-60W Jolly Green II with the 41st Rescue Squadron hoists 38th Rescue Squadron pararescuemen during alternate insertion extraction training at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Sept. 23, 2021. Pararescuemen train with the HH-60 on various AIE methods to maintain proficiency. The four most common methods used during AIE are fast-rope, rope ladder, rappel and hoist. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

Photo of an Airman holding a rope

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jon Mellen, 38th Rescue Squadron pararescuemen, stabilizes a rope during a vertical litter hoist at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Sept. 23, 2021. Part of PJ’s mission is to rescue and recover downed aircrews from hostile or austere locations. Regular AIE training prepares them for future contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

Photo of Airmen rappelling from a helicopter

U.S. Air Force 38th Rescue Squadron pararescuemen descend from a 41st Rescue Squadron HH-60W Jolly Green II during alternate insertion extraction training at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Sept. 23, 2021. Part of PJ’s mission is to rescue and recover downed aircrews from hostile or austere locations. Regular AIE training prepares them for future contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

Photo of Airmen rappelling from a helicopter

A U.S. Air Force HH-60W Jolly Green II with the 41st Rescue Squadron hoists 38th Rescue Squadron pararescuemen during alternate insertion extraction training at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Sept. 23, 2021. PJs train exactly how they would perform in a real-world mission by simulating real casualties and injuries. Part of PJ’s mission is to rescue and recover downed aircrews from hostile or austere locations. Regular AIE training prepares them for future contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

Photo of Airmen in the woods

U.S. Air Force 38th Rescue Squadron pararescuemen signal to the 41st Rescue Squadron aircrew during alternate insertion extraction training at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Sept. 23, 2021. Pararescuemen practiced various hoisting procedures to include a vertical litter hoist. Part of PJ’s mission is to rescue and recover downed aircrews from hostile or austere locations. Regular AIE training prepares them for future contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

Photo of Airmen rappelling from a helicopter

U.S. Air Force 38th Rescue Squadron pararescuemen are lifted to a 41st Rescue Squadron HH-60W Jolly Green II during alternate insertion extraction training at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Sept. 23, 2021. The four most common methods used during AIE are fast-rope, rope ladder, rappel and hoist. Part of PJ’s mission is to rescue and recover downed aircrews from hostile or austere locations. Regular AIE training prepares them for future contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

Photo of a helicopter flying over trees

A U.S. Air Force HH-60W Jolly Green II with the 41st Rescue Squadron flies overhead during alternate insertion extraction training at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Sept. 23, 2021. Pararescuemen train with the HH-60 on various AIE methods to maintain proficiency. The four most common methods used during AIE are fast-rope, rope ladder, rappel and hoist. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

Photo of Airman rappelling from a helicopter
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A U.S. Air Force HH-60W Jolly Green II with the 41st Rescue Squadron hoists 38th Rescue Squadron pararescuemen during alternate insertion extraction training at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Sept. 23, 2021. The four most common methods used during AIE are fast-rope, rope ladder, rappel and hoist. Part of PJ’s mission is to rescue and recover downed aircrews from hostile or austere locations. Regular AIE training prepares them for future contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

Photo of two Airmen in the woods
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Two U.S. Air Force 38th Rescue Squadron pararescuemen descend from a 41st Rescue Squadron HH-60W Jolly Green II during alternate insertion extraction training at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Sept. 23, 2021. The four most common methods used during AIE are fast-rope, rope ladder, rappel and hoist. Part of PJ’s mission is to rescue and recover downed aircrews from hostile or austere locations. Regular AIE training prepares them for future contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

Photo of an airborne helicopter from the ground
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A U.S. Air Force 38th Rescue Squadron pararescueman and a 41st Rescue Squadron flight engineer observe two pararescuemen as they descend from an HH-60W Jolly Green II aircraft during alternate insertion extraction training at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Sept. 23, 2021. Pararescuemen practiced various hoisting procedures to include a vertical litter hoist. Part of PJ’s mission is to rescue and recover downed aircrews from hostile or austere locations. Regular AIE training prepares them for future contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

Photo of Airmen rappelling from a helicopter
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A U.S. Air Force 38th Rescue Squadron pararescueman hoists up a simulated casualty during alternate insertion extraction training at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Sept. 23, 2021. The purpose of a vertical litter hoist is to enhance evacuation capabilities in the event the PJs have to rescue someone from a heavily wooded area. Part of PJ’s mission is to rescue and recover downed aircrews from hostile or austere locations. Regular AIE training prepares them for future contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

Photo of helicopter flying through the sky
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A U.S. Air Force HH-60W Jolly Green II aircraft with the 41st Rescue Squadron flies overhead during alternate insertion extraction training at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Sept. 23, 2021. Pararescuemen train with the HH-60 on various AIE methods to maintain proficiency. The four most common methods used during AIE are fast-rope, rope ladder, rappel and hoist. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Georgia --

The 38th Rescue Squadron and 41st Rescue Squadron conducted alternate insertion extraction training at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, Sept. 23, 2021.

It is crucial for pararescuemen to practice various extraction scenarios so they are prepared for unpredictable real-world rescue missions. The training ensured they are capable in rescuing individuals, such as downed aircrew, from wooded areas.