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74, 75 AMU recognize new dedicated crew chiefs

Photo of an Airman receiving coveralls and a certificate

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jacob Word, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit dedicated crew chief, receives coveralls and a certificate during a dedicated crew chief ceremony at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, July 19, 2021. The ceremony was held to recognize and congratulate the 74th AMU’s newest dedicated crew chiefs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jasmine M. Barnes)

Photo of Airmen posing

U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 75th Aircraft Maintenance Unit pose for a photo after a dedicated crew chief ceremony at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, July 19, 2021. During the ceremony, pilots presented their respective dedicated crew chiefs with a set of coveralls and a certificate. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jasmine M. Barnes)

Photo of an Airman making remarks

U.S. Air Force Maj. Ammon Hennessee, 23d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron commander, makes remarks during a dedicated crew chief ceremony at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, July 19, 2021. Once a maintenance Airman earns the dedicated crew chief title, they earn the privilege to place their name on the aircraft they are assigned to. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jasmine M. Barnes)

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. --

The 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit and 75th Aircraft Maintenance Unit each hosted a dedicated crew chief ceremony July 19, 2021.

The two units recognized and congratulated the newest dedicated crew chiefs in the 23d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron.

While maintainers are responsible for ensuring an aircraft’s operational status, dedicated crew chiefs have the honor of being assigned to a specific aircraft.

“A dedicated crew chief is essentially the keeper of airplanes,” said Staff Sgt. Ryan Fletcher, 74th AMU dedicated crew chief. “We take care of the jet and make sure it’s clean and ready to fly at a moment’s notice.”

During both ceremonies, pilots rewarded their respective dedicated crew chiefs with certificates and a pair of coveralls. Additionally, once an Airman earns the dedicated crew chief title, they are also given the opportunity to put their name on the aircraft they are assigned to.
 
“Being a dedicated crew chief means you have been chosen by supervision and you have the correct skill level,” said Tech. Sgt. Michael Rice, 75th AMU dedicated crew chief. “It’s a very distinct and honored [opportunity] to be assigned to an aircraft because that is a reflection of who you are and how you take care of your aircraft.”

Without dedicated crew chiefs, it would be more difficult for pilots to complete sorties. Because dedicated crew chiefs are held accountable for their assigned jet, their relationship with the pilot assigned to that jet is just as important.
 
“The connection between a pilot and dedicated crew chief is huge,” said Fletcher. “Having good relationships makes good sorties and good morale. Our job is to ensure that the aircraft is safe for pilots every time they fly, and being appreciated by our pilot is awesome.”