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23d WG adds resident advocate position

A photo of the resident advocate posing for a photo

Tracy Boyd, 23d Wing resident advocate, poses for a photo Sept. 16, 2020, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. Boyd, the first resident advocate at Moody, is responsible for facilitating resolutions of issues privatized-housing residents experience and will be a liaison between residents and wing leadership. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taryn Butler)

A photo of the resident advocate speaking with a client

Tracy Boyd, 23d Wing resident advocate, speaks with a simulated client Sept. 16, 2020, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. Boyd, the first resident advocate at Moody, is responsible for facilitating resolutions of issues privatized-housing residents experience and will be a liaison between residents and wing leadership. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taryn Butler)

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. --

Airmen who live in privatized housing now have another tool to help them resolve issues.

Tracy Boyd, 23d Wing resident advocate, is taking over a new position to help facilitate resolutions for residents who have exhausted all other avenues.

“It's another level of assistance for the housing resident,” Boyd said. “The resident advocate will be a liaison between the resident and wing leadership. It’s another tool they have so they can voice their concerns or even bring ideas to the table for improvements for their neighborhoods.”

If a resident has an issue that needs to be resolved, they should speak to their property management company. If the issue isn’t resolved, the resident can take the issue to the other entities: the community manager, the military housing office, and then the resident advocate.

“[I] work directly for the wing,” Boyd said. “If anybody came to me with a concern, the next level that I go to is Col. Conde and Col. Walls. [I talk with them] so they are aware they do have a military member who is not satisfied with the responses they have been getting.”

Boyd said the MHO and the privatized-housing companies have a good working relationship and both want what’s best for the residents. For some issues, Boyd can use her past 15-year career in military housing to help facilitate a resolution both parties are happy with.

“I would like for all privatized housing residents to realize that there is someone else that can listen to them and hear their concerns,” Boyd said. “I do hope that my experience [working] with the residents and knowing some of the processes will help smooth things over for somebody who might be having some problems.”

For Elizabeth Boone, a Team Moody spouse and privatized-housing resident, this new position gives residents a voice.

“I feel that a housing resident advocate [is a] great thing,” Boone said. “I am hoping she will be able to give us the right response and … more of a sense of being heard. No one likes to complain, but when a person complains, they want a response.”

For the future, Boyd has plans to strengthen communication between residents and wing leadership.

“We are putting together a resident council that will meet with Col. Walls or Col. Conde on a quarterly basis so that [residents] have a direct link to wing leadership to hear their concerns,” Boyd said. “I hope the residents will have a positive feedback session with wing leadership so they can bring any of their concerns to [leadership’s] attention or something positive they want leadership to know is happening within their neighborhoods.”

If a resident needs to speak with Boyd, they can contact her directly by calling 229-257-3537 to set up an appointment. Boyd is located in the military housing office, Bldg. 320.

“I'm in a different hallway from [the MHO and private owners] and have a different entrance so if a resident wanted to come visit me and bring a concern to my attention, they could come in the back door if they just don't want others to know that they're talking to me,” Boyd said. “I want to give each person their due time and listen, so it would be best to have an appointment.”