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Airmen wash 'Hawg'

Airmen wash an A-10C Thunderbolt II, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga.In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Airmen wash an A-10C Thunderbolt II, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga.In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Airmen prepare an A-10C Thunderbolt II for a wash, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga.In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Airmen prepare an A-10C Thunderbolt II for a wash, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga.In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Airman 1st Class Jake Dromgold, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit crew chief, washes the wing of an A-10C Thunderbolt II, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Airman 1st Class Jake Dromgold, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit crew chief, washes the wing of an A-10C Thunderbolt II, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Airman 1st Class Jake Dromgold, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit crew chief, prepares to connect his harness to a hook, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Airman 1st Class Jake Dromgold, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit crew chief, prepares to connect his harness to a hook, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Senior Airman Michael Atkinson, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit dedicated crew chief, sprays the side of an A-10C Thunderbolt II, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Senior Airman Michael Atkinson, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit dedicated crew chief, sprays the side of an A-10C Thunderbolt II, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Senior Airman Michael Atkinson, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit dedicated crew chief, protects a component before washing an A-10C Thunderbolt II, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Airmen sealed off various electrical components prior to the wash to protect them from chemicals within the soap. In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Senior Airman Michael Atkinson, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit dedicated crew chief, protects a component before washing an A-10C Thunderbolt II, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Airmen sealed off various electrical components prior to the wash to protect them from chemicals within the soap. In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Senior Airman Michael Atkinson, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit dedicated crew chief, sprays the side of an A-10C Thunderbolt II, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Senior Airman Michael Atkinson, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit dedicated crew chief, sprays the side of an A-10C Thunderbolt II, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Senior Airman Michael Atkinson, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit dedicated crew chief, washes the teeth on an A-10C Thunderbolt II, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga.
In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Senior Airman Michael Atkinson, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit dedicated crew chief, washes the teeth on an A-10C Thunderbolt II, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Senior Airman Michael Atkinson, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit dedicated crew chief, cleans a component of an A-10C Thunderbolt II, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

Senior Airman Michael Atkinson, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit dedicated crew chief, cleans a component of an A-10C Thunderbolt II, Feb. 8, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. In addition to mechanical and electrical maintenance, A-10’s must be washed every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours in order to control corrosion caused by residue from the gun and engine exhaust. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson)

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. --