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EOD tests response readiness

An Air Force medium sized robot extracts a string from a simulated improvised explosive device during a response training exercise, Dec. 21, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The EOD Airmen were evaluated on their ability to respond to a distress call, locate, identify and neutralize an improvised explosive device. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eugene Oliver)

An Air Force medium sized robot extracts a string from a simulated improvised explosive device during a response training exercise, Dec. 21, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The EOD Airmen were evaluated on their ability to respond to a distress call, locate, identify and neutralize an improvised explosive device. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eugene Oliver)

Tech Sgt. Nickolas Adkisson, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) team leader, examines a computer screen during a response training exercise, Dec. 21, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The EOD Airmen were evaluated on their ability to respond to a distress call, locate, identify and neutralize an improvised explosive device. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eugene Oliver)

Tech Sgt. Nickolas Adkisson, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) team leader, examines a computer screen during a response training exercise, Dec. 21, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The EOD Airmen were evaluated on their ability to respond to a distress call, locate, identify and neutralize an improvised explosive device. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eugene Oliver)

An Air Force medium sized robot approaches a simulated Improvised Explosive Device during a response training exercise, Dec. 21, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The EOD Airmen were evaluated on their ability to respond to a distress call, locate, identify and neutralize an improvised explosive device. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eugene Oliver)

An Air Force medium sized robot approaches a simulated Improvised Explosive Device during a response training exercise, Dec. 21, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The EOD Airmen were evaluated on their ability to respond to a distress call, locate, identify and neutralize an improvised explosive device. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eugene Oliver)

Tech Sgt. Nickolas Adkisson, left, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) team leader, drags a wagon towards Senior Airman Trenton Broxterman, 23d CES EOD apprentice, during a response training exercise, Dec. 21, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The EOD Airmen were evaluated on their ability to respond to a distress call, locate, identify and neutralize an improvised explosive device. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eugene Oliver)

Tech Sgt. Nickolas Adkisson, left, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) team leader, drags a wagon towards Senior Airman Trenton Broxterman, 23d CES EOD apprentice, during a response training exercise, Dec. 21, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The EOD Airmen were evaluated on their ability to respond to a distress call, locate, identify and neutralize an improvised explosive device. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eugene Oliver)

Senior Airman Trenton Broxterman, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) apprentice, explains a display screen to Lt. Col Michael Francis, 23d CES commander, during a response training exercise, Dec 21, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The EOD Airmen were evaluated on their ability to respond to a distress call, locate, identify and neutralize an improvised explosive device. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eugene Oliver)

Senior Airman Trenton Broxterman, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) apprentice, explains a display screen to Lt. Col Michael Francis, 23d CES commander, during a response training exercise, Dec 21, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The EOD Airmen were evaluated on their ability to respond to a distress call, locate, identify and neutralize an improvised explosive device. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eugene Oliver)

Senior Airman Trenton Broxterman, right, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) apprentice, adjusts a body suit for Tech Sgt. Nick Adkisson, 23d CES EOD team leader, during a response training exercise, Dec 21, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga.  The EOD Airmen were evaluated on their ability to respond to a distress call, locate, identify and neutralize an improvised explosive device. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eugene Oliver)

Senior Airman Trenton Broxterman, right, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) apprentice, adjusts a body suit for Tech Sgt. Nick Adkisson, 23d CES EOD team leader, during a response training exercise, Dec 21, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The EOD Airmen were evaluated on their ability to respond to a distress call, locate, identify and neutralize an improvised explosive device. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eugene Oliver)

Tech. Sgt. Nickolas Adkisson, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) team leader, places a radiation device on the ground during a response training exercise, Dec. 21, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga.

Tech. Sgt. Nickolas Adkisson, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) team leader, places a radiation device on the ground during a response training exercise, Dec. 21, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The EOD Airmen were evaluated on their ability to respond to a distress call, locate, identify and neutralize an improvised explosive device. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eugene Oliver)

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. --

Airmen from the 23d Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) participated in an Explosive Ordinance Disposal (EOD) response exercise, Dec. 21, here.

The training evaluated the Airmen on their ability to respond to a distress call, locate, identify and neutralize an improvised explosive device.

“This is a good opportunity for us to train and improve as a unit,” said Capt. Nervik, 23d CES EOD flight commander. “We’re looking for our Airmen to perform well and handle any situation we throw at them.”

While finding the device was their primary goal, the Airmen were also assessed on properly following safety procedures and making sure they follow the necessary steps to properly complete the mission.

“A lot goes into our job and we have specific measures to follow to make sure that nobody gets hurt,” said Tech. Sgt. Nick Adkisson, 23d CES EOD team leader. “If we forget one step or overlook a single detail it can be fatal.”

EOD Airmen can face many different types of problems that can have ever changing technicalities so being prepared to handle them all is key to being successful.

“We can face situations ranging from peacetime-stateside to terrorist explosives,” said Tech Sgt. Isaiah Armstrong, 23d CES EOD operations NCO in charge. “If we’re not prepared for every scenario thousands will be at harm.”

While EOD Airmen conduct rigorous training, their hope is that they never face a potentially dangerous situation.

“As emergency responders if we’re not doing our jobs than that’s good because that means something terrible’s not occurring,” said Nervik. “In the meantime, because our job is inherently dangerous, we have to practice to make sure when we do have to do a job, we’re prepared.”