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Moody’s annual Operational Cinderella, a donation drive for formal women’s attire, is in full swing and is slated to run until Sept. 16. Operation Cinderella is a nation-wide donation drive that was adopted by Moody Air Force Base in order to gain maximum participation for the upcoming Air Force Ball by providing free formal women’s attire to those who wish to attend. (U.S. Air Force courtesy photo) Team Moody gives back to Operation Cinderella
Moody’s annual Operational Cinderella, a donation drive for formal women’s attire, is in full swing and is slated to run until Sept. 16, here. Operation Cinderella is a nation-wide donation drive that was adopted by Moody in order to gain maximum participation for the upcoming Air Force Ball by providing free formal women’s attire to those who wish to attend.
0 9/01
2017
Members of the 23d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron prepare an A-10C Thunderbolt II to be washed, Aug. 28, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Maintenance procedures require that A-10s are washed at least every 180 days to prevent maintenance issues and safety hazards to the pilot. Since strong chemicals are used to clean the aircraft Airmen must wear personal protective equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) A 23d Wing ‘hawg’ gets a bath
What has roughly 40 teeth, sounds like ‘brrrt,’ and occasionally needs a bath? The 23d Wing’s A-10C Thunderbolt IIs, also known as ‘Hawgs,’ are subject to an assortment of scheduled maintenance appointments to include washes every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours. “It’s extremely important that maintenance keeps the aircraft clean,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Thomas Harney, 75th Fighter Squadron director of operations and A-10 pilot. “Every time we fire the gun, gases flow up and cover the aircraft with grease which can affect operational components of the aircraft and the pilot’s visibility.”
0 9/01
2017
374th Public Health, Preventative Health Month 23d CES combats mosquito threats
Due to recent confirmed cases of mosquito disease outbreaks by the Georgia Department of Public Health in South Georgia, Moody’s 23d Civil Engineering Squadron pest management team is being proactive to combat mosquito-borne illnesses. They are accomplishing this by teaching Airmen, their families and the community about mosquito-borne illnesses, the symptoms to look out for, and the precautions to take to avoid being infected by a mosquito.
0 8/31
2017
Default Air Force Logo Be memorable, inspire future generations
Staff Sgts. Stan Mason, Charlie Jefferson, Doc Lawrence, and Master Sgt. Kenneth G. Webb. None of you know these individuals, but their legacy and efforts as supervisors are evident.These NCOs were my very first influences in the Air Force and the reason I am wearing these chevrons today.Front-line supervisors have the greatest impact on the Air
0 8/29
2017
An aircrew flight equipment technician from the 347th Operations Support Squadron, left, removes a mask from Capt. Chisom Ezeoke, 71st Rescue Squadron combat systems officer, during Aircrew Contamination Control Area training, Aug. 24, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga ACCA training teaches aircrew how to remove and properly handle any contamination on their gear.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt) ACCA: training insight to beat CBRN’s
Airmen from the 347th Operations Support Squadron performed Aircrew Contamination Control Area training, Aug. 24, here. ACCA training teaches aircrew how to remove and properly handle any contamination on their gear. The training is provided monthly or at the request of the aircrew.
0 8/28
2017
Tech. Sgt. Bert Leuschen, 23d Security Forces Squadron flight sergeant, responds to a simulated active shooter situation during an emergency response exercise, Aug. 22, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The purpose of this active-shooter exercise was to inspect the recovery phase of an emergency situation while maintaining realism as members still responded as normal. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) Emergency exercise tests Moody’s capabilities
The 23d Wing Inspection Team held an emergency response exercise, Aug. 22, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The purpose of this particular exercise was to inspect the recovery phase of an active-shooter situation. “In my twelve years, I’ve been to very few exercises that flow from the beginning to the actual responding, recovery and clean-up,” said U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Ross Stiegemeier, 23d Wing NCO in charge of the Wing Inspection Team. “So this time we were focused on the recovery phase in the [scenario] where the individuals are dead. There’s no longer a threat, so what do we do now?”
0 8/24
2017
Airmen from the 32d Air Refueling Squadron, Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J., secure cargo for Weapons School, Aug. 19, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The Airmen were travelling to Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., to support the Weapons Instructor Course, which trains tactical experts and leaders to control and exploit air, space and cyberspace. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt) Airmen embark for Weapons School
Members of Team Moody departed in support of the Air Force Weapons School, Aug. 19, here. Hosted at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., the Weapons Instructor Course provides advanced weapons training to weapons officers so they can return as lead instructors within their squadrons.
0 8/23
2017
Col. Jennifer Short, 23d Wing Commander, speaks to Emerge Moody and Leadership Moody students, August 18, 2017, Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Emerge Moody and Leadership Moody is an opportunity for 20 Team Moody members to engage in a nine month curriculum where they will gain leadership and networking skills to disperse throughout their units. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Eugene Oliver) Emerge, Leadership Moody 2018 kicks off
The 2018 Emerge Moody and Leadership Moody courses began Aug 18. with an initial meeting and team building rope course at Valdosta State University.
0 8/22
2017
Both 23d Component Maintenance Squadron propulsion technicians, Airman 1st Class Anthony Guevara, left, and Airman 1st Class Jesse Mendheim, disassemble a TF-34 engine used in A-10C Thunderbolt lls, Jan. 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Airmen pay close attention to detail while systematically breaking the engine down. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) Continuous Process Improvement bears fruit
The investment in Airmen’s ideas through a Continuous Process Improvement event this past January has Moody’s propulsion team displaying measurable improvements in the timeliness and effectiveness of supporting the A-10C Thunderbolt II’s increased flying mission. Over the last seven months, The 23d Component Maintenance Squadron has gradually implemented the ideas from approximately 20 civilians and Airmen from almost every enlisted rank to better maintain the TF-34 engine used in A-10s. The results speak for themselves. “We have seen our Airmen at all levels react positively to the initiative,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Michael Irwin, 23d CMS former commander during the CPI event. “The men and women at the Propulsion flight have completely embraced the idea of continuous improvement and they want to be the best! You can feel that excitement every time you visit their facility.”
0 8/17
2017
An Airman from the 41st Helicopter Maintenance Unit attaches a panel to the tail of an HH-60G Pave Hawk, Jan. 7, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The 41st HMU works 24/7 to ensure aircraft are ready to fly at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Callaghan/Released)

41st maintainers reach perfection
When most Airmen on the flightline see aircraft tail number A6773 flying through the sky, they see a typical HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter. Now because of the hard work from the 41st Helicopter Maintenance Unit, they see a distinct mythical unicorn that hasn’t been seen in 10 years. These Airmen dedicated hundreds of hours of hard work to achieve not one, but three “black letter initials,” a marking of approval on an inspection checklist certifying that the aircraft is not only mission-ready, but it is operationally perfect: zero discrepancies, zero write-ups and zero inspection violations.
0 8/10
2017
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